Archive for the ‘Paper’ Category

Dual Arch Medium

December 1, 2017

Bruce asks,

I am searching for a company that manufactures corrugated sheets with dual arch medium capability. Our location is Dalton Ohio, is there anybody you could refer me to please? I know there is a supplier in Florida that does this medium, but freight is too costly.

I have reached out to some industry contacts. I’m awaiting a phone call. Also a search within the iDirectory revealed no information.

While we’re waiting to hear back, let’s toss this one out the readers too! Is anybody near Ohio running double arch?

— Ralph

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What the #1W?!

December 1, 2017

Steve asks,

I have a customer asking me to interpret and explain this call out “ 200E #1W”.

The 200E part is easy. It’s the #1W is a bit more ambiguous…I don’t believe it is industry standard expression. Could it be a designation for coated SBS?

Oh yes. A long history here.

# 1 could be Kemi, Coated SBS, or Coated label stock

#2 does not exist anymore or a lightly coated white top or uncoated SBS

#3 is what we refer to today as uncoated white top.

— Ralph

Rod Coating vs. Flood Coating

August 2, 2017

Geordie asks,

We’re considering some new equipment and looking for some information on flood coating versus rod coating.

If I were looking for new equipment I would probably lean toward rod coating. In my opinion rod coating is more effective and accurate than flood coating. Rod coating provides a very wide coating weight range. They also allow much greater precision in coating weight control and are typically much easier to operate. The rod coating process also provides superior cross machine coating uniformity as compared to flood coating.

Most modern rod coater designs make very easy and quick to change the coating thicknesses as well. So if minimizing changeover time is important to you that may be another advantage to rod coating.

— Ralph

 

Cracking Litho-lam, Does ‘Sides’ Matter

May 8, 2017

Clint asks,

I have a question that I hope you can answer.  When using the same liner board on both the inside and outside of a singelwall sheet, why do you see more of the “flute lines” on one side versus the other?  What causes that and does it have more effect on fracturing the liners when you are creasing one side versus the other?

This came up when one of my customers was laminating a litho label on SInglewall.  They normally laminate it to the good side (less visible fluted lines).  Because some of the sheets were slightly warped, they laminated some on the bad side (more lines).  After converting there was some fracturing of the litho (not liners).   We saw less fracturing of the litho on the labels that were laminated to the bad side.  From a logical standpoint, if you put the label on the bad side and it is a weaker paper, I think the label may stretch easier versus being glued to a heavier liner.  Also, the inside of the box would look better (less visible flute lines) so I would assume this should be the norm unless you are just spot labeling something.  Keep in mind, the liners on the inner and outer were supposedly the same paper.

What are your thoughts on this?

 

Thank you for an excellent question. Yes, I can add some insight.

Tensile strength and stretch of the liners are impacted differently in the singleface and doubleback operations. Also temperatures and starch application are different in the two operations. Fracturing can occur in one liner and not the other. Learning flutes can have an impact. Microphotographs of the cross section of the combined sheet can begin to reveal some issues.

Of course starch application and amount can signal issues as you described. World class consumption would be about 1.4 # per msf.

– Ralph